A.7 The Ecological Body

  • 2019-08-05, 10:00–12:30, Tent 17
  • 2019-08-06, 10:00–12:30, Tent 17
  • 2019-08-07, 10:00–12:30, Tent 17
  • 2019-08-08, 10:00–12:30, Tent 17

We have embodied the physical attitudes of a sedentary society by outsourcing our vital human movements into something or someone else with its visible consequences on our own mental and physical health as well as on the ecology of the planet.
Honouring our basic evolutionary physical movement requirements implies redesigning our everyday life, habitats and cities.


We have inadvertently embodied the physical attitudes of a sedentary society. In it we have learnt to outsource our vital human movements of transport, food gathering, shelter, etc., into something or someone else (e.g. a car, a mechanical escalator, a farmer in the Southern hemisphere) with its visible consequences on our own mental and physical health as well as on the ecology of the planet.

We have developed what has initially been called “diseases of captivity” because of the close similarities with the diseases suffered by animals in captivity. Actually, they are called “diseases of affluence” because they are generally suffered by the part of our societies who have become wealthier and who can afford to “outsource” its vital movements.

The list of diseases of affluence that can be related to our lifestyle go from obesity, heart diseases, diabetes, osteoporosis, Alzheimer, dementias, some types of cancer, lung diseases, as well as attention deficit disorder, depression, anxiety, etc.

On the contrary, our whole human being has been designed through movement through thousands of years of Evolution. In the words of neuroscientist and engineer Daniel Wolpert: “We have a brain for one reason and one reason only: that’s to produce adaptable and complex movements. Movement is the only way we have affecting the world around us”

As we can see, moving is not an optional. Not doing so has an enormous toll on our health as well as on the health of others and the planet.

Honouring our basic evolutionary physical movement requirements implies walking, running, squatting, pulling, jumping, throwing, climbing among other movements.
It implies too, redesigning our everyday life, habitats and cities. As well as rethinking through movement our education system.

Bearing in mind this principle, will allow us to redesign our own personal environment (homes, furniture, clothes, etc), as well as our urban contexts where: walkable cities, effective public transport, sharing of goods, schools, community work and urban farming, become all possibilities to nourish our physical movement. It implies too a change of perspective between rural areas and urban areas.

During the course we will share theoretical concepts and scientific data and experience them physically through movement, physical games and dancing. We will become aware of all the movement choices we have and could have redesigning our environment.

We will also create together narratives, images and effective strategies, in order to embody and share all of these with the purpose of massively scaling its positive impact. We will also foster the creation of “moving groups” to support each other, share experiences, create initiatives and synergies.

We follow the principle that we can only share what has emotionally moved us and has been physically embodied. We aim to embody the transformations we need to achieve in order to contribute personally and socially to climate justice


Prerequisites for participants – comfortable clothes